FREE Essay on Analysis of Jordan Baker: The Great Gatsby

During the Roaring Twenties, the role of women in society took on new forms and pushed unprecedented boundaries. Women were more independent as well as promiscuous. Jordan Baker’s maleness in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby depicts the changing woman in the 1920’s. Fitzgerald blends the strong individualistic woman of the twenties with her feminine counterpart through his character, Jordan Baker. Jordan, an unmarried professional golf player, is assertively independent and seems rather masculine in contrast to Daisy Buchanan, her “girlie,” character foil.

An essay or paper on Analysis of Jordan Baker: The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby is a story told by Nick Carraway, who was once Gatsby's neighbor, and he tells the story sometime after 1922, when the incidents that fill the book take place. As the story opens, Nick has just moved from the Midwest to West Egg, Long Island, seeking his fortune as a bond salesman. Shortly after his arrival, Nick travels across the Sound to the more fashionable East Egg to visit his cousin Daisy Buchannan and her husband, Tom, a hulking, imposing man whom Nick had known in college. There he meets professional golfer Jordan Baker. The Buchannans and Jordan Baker live privileged lives, contrasting sharply in sensibility and luxury with Nick's more modest and grounded lifestyle. When Nick returns home that evening, he notices his neighbor, Gatsby, mysteriously standing in the dark and stretching his arms toward the water, and a solitary green light across the Sound.


Essay about Jordan Baker in Great Gatsby - 731 Words

Jordan Baker in Great Gatsby

Depending on the topic you will choose for the essay, provide interesting facts about the early years of Jordan’s career, his family and hobbies. Talking about the favorite leisure the basketball player gives prefers, the author of the essay should mention that MJ is a great mellow music and jazz fan. He used to spend his free hours listening to his favorite Anita Baker, Rachelle Ferrell, and Erykah Badu.


Jordan Baker was an essential character in the writing of The Great Gatsby. She depicted the recklessness, dishonesty, and arrogance of many people of the East Egg; on the other hand, Jordan Baker represented the independence and self-sufficience of women.To protest that some fairly improbable people, some people who could not possibly respect themselves, seem to sleep easily enough is to miss the point entirely, as surely as those people miss it who think that self-respect has necessarily to do with not having safety pins in one's underwear. There is a common superstition that "self-respect" is a kind of charm against snakes, something that keeps those who have it locked in some unblighted Eden, out of strange beds, ambivalent conversations, and trouble in general. It does not at all. It has nothing to do with the face of things, but concerns instead a separate peace, a private reconciliation. Although the careless, suicidal Julian English in Appointment in Samarra and the careless, incurably dishonest Jordan Baker in The Great Gatsby seem equally improbable candidates for self-respect, Jordan Baker had it, Julian English did not. With that genius for accommodation more often seen in women than in men, Jordan took her own measure, made her own peace, avoided threats to that peace: "I hate careless people," she told Nick Carraway. "It takes two to make an accident." Detailed Analysis: The Great Gatsby (p.13-15) In this passage Nick Carraway is visiting his cousin Daisy and her husband Tom Buchanan, a former member of Nick's social club at Yale University, on East Egg. Inside, Daisy lounges on a couch with her friend, Jordan Baker, a competitive golfer who yawns as though bored by her surroundings. As Nick enters he describes his two female companions in extreme detail. F. Scott Fitzgerald uses imagery on many occasions to aid the reader to picture the setting. He describes the women's dresses fluttering in the wind as though they had "just been blown back in after a short flight around the house" (p.13). Fitzgerald also illustrates the women seeming to be "buoyed up..upon an anchored balloon" (p.13). Nick is unlike the other inhabitants of West Egg--he was educated at Yale and has social connections in East Egg, a fashionable area of Long Island home to the established upper class. Nick drives out to East Egg one evening for dinner with his cousin, Daisy Buchanan, and her husband, Tom, an erstwhile classmate of Nick's at Yale. Daisy and Tom introduce Nick to Jordan Baker, a beautiful, cynical young woman with whom Nick begins a romantic relationship. Nick also learns a bit about Daisy and Tom's marriage: Jordan tells him that Tom has a lover, Myrtle Wilson, who lives in the valley of ashes, a gray industrial dumping ground between West Egg and New York City. Not long after this revelation, Nick travels to New York City with Tom and Myrtle. At a vulgar, gaudy party in the apartment that Tom keeps for the affair, Myrtle begins to taunt Tom about Daisy, and Tom responds by breaking her nose.