being the global dimension of Education for Citizenship”

During the past decade higher education's interest in internationalization has intensified, and the concept of civic education or engagement has broadened from a national focus to a more global one, thus expanding the concept that civic responsibility extends beyond national borders.

Third, the concept of global citizenship creates conceptual and practical connections rather than cleavages. The commonalities between what happens at home and "over there" become visible. The characteristics that human beings share are balanced against the differences that are so conspicuous. On a practical level, global citizenship provides a concept that can create bridges between the work of internationalization and multicultural education. Although these efforts have different histories and trajectories, they also share important goals of cultural empathy and intercultural competence (Olson et al. 2007).


Citizenship Education in India - Essay by Asah00 - Anti Essays

Educating global citizens to make a real difference on AFS Intercultural Programs

This digital magazine explores intercultural and global citizenship education, voluntarism and social impact, through articles, interviews, and learning tools created by respected thought leaders and experts.


Intercultural competence occupies a central position in higher education's thinking about global citizenship and is seen as an important skill in the workplace.

It is taught in the as an exam subject for the Junior Certificate. It is known as Civic, Social and Political Education (CSPE). A new Leaving Certificate exam subject with the working title 'Politics & Society' is being developed by the (NCCA) and is expected to be introduced to the curriculum sometime after 2012."" is the philosophy that citizens should work towards the betterment of their community through economic participation, public, volunteer work, and other such efforts to improve life for all citizens. In this vein, citizenship education is taught in schools, as an academic subject in some countries. By the time children reach secondary education there is an emphasis on such unconventional subjects to be included in academic curriculum. While the diagram on citizenship to the right is rather facile and depth-less, it is simplified to explain the general model of citizenship that is taught to many secondary school pupils. The idea behind this model within education is to instill in young pupils that their actions (i.e. their ) affect collective citizenship and thus in turn them.The first volume focuses on historical and philosophical material. Volume two examines the purposes of citizenship education, including arguments for particular aspects such as 'race', class, gender or broader matters such as justice and equality. The third volume describes and discusses particular forms of education that relate strongly and directly to citizenship education, e.g. global education, character education, political education, moral education, social education). Volume four focuses on material about socialisation, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. The first volume focuses on historical and philosophical material. Volume two examines the purposes of citizenship education, including arguments for particular aspects such as 'race', class, gender or broader matters such as justice and equality. The third volume describes and discusses particular forms of education that relate strongly and directly to citizenship education, e.g. global education, character education, political education, moral education, social education). Volume four focuses on material about socialisation, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment.