the role of biochemistry in medicine in present and future

In agriculture, biochemistry studies the interaction of herbicides with plants. Herbicides are substances used to destroy plants. In Medical Science, utilizing biochemistry in medicine opens a window of cure for diseases and vaccines. In Food science, biochemist study such topics as how living things obtain energy from food, ways to develop abundant and inexpensive sources of nutritious foods, determines the chemical composition of foods, develop methods to extract nutrients from waste products or invest ways to prolong the shelf life food products.

Why is biochemistry important? - Quora

Author: Claudia M. Caruana
Chemistry Connections:
History/Biography, Organic/Biochemistry, Solids/Liquids/Gases
Description:
Describes and explains the way in which general and local inhaled anesthetics work in the human body. Provides the reader with some history of anesthesia—from 4200 BC to the present day—including nitrous oxide, ether and modern inhalation anesthetics, halogenated ethers. Discusses some biochemical mechanisms suggested to explain the effect of an anesthetic on the nervous system, although it also states the lack of a precise medical/scientific understanding of how anesthetics work.


Originally Answered: Why is biochemistry important

Biochemistry is a valuable subject in medicine without which there would have been no such advancement in the field.

One can study biochemistry as a part of graduation or post graduation like in medical biochemistry, forensic biochemistry, agriculture biochemistry etc.


Author: Nadia Halim
Chemistry Connections:
Bonding, Organic/Biochemistry
Description:
Nanotechnology utilizing the elements carbon and silicon create nanostructures (1-100 nanos large) for use in electronics, medicine (drug delivery systems), clean energy production (solar cells). Three basic structures are nanotubes, nanowires, and fullerenes (“Bucky balls”). Construction of a nanostructure by electron beam lithography and photolithography is illustrated.Biochemistry of plants gave way to the breakthrough of how food is synthesized in them and the reason why they are autotrophs i.e. not dependent on other living beings for food. Biochemistry in plants describesAuthor: Michael Tinnesand
Chemistry Connections:
Bonding, Organic/Biochemistry
Description:
Describes the digestive processes in animals, specifically a dog in this article, with emphasis on the breaking and reforming of chemical bonds in biomolecules. The role of enzymes is used to explain why cellulose, which is made up of glucose units, cannot be digested but starch, also made up of glucose, cannot. Article notes that most animals that feed on a cellulose-rich diet cannot digest cellulose and, therefore, have a symbiotic relationship with micro-organisms that break down the cellulose.My love of science began with the ocean. As a child, our spent every available hour at the beach. Playing in the waves, digging holes and dams in the sand, watching the coastal flora and fauna interact in their environment fed my curiosity of the natural world. As I began my education, I enjoyed history and literature, but the sciences always peaked a special interest. In elementary school, our yearly field trip to the aquarium was my favorite day of the year. In middle school I won the science fair with my analysis of fire-retardant baby clothing. In my sophomore year of high school, I met the teacher who influenced my the most, Dr. Price, my AP Biology teacher. I knew I wanted to succeed in AP Biology but Dr. Price refused to hold anyone’s hand. My success or failure would be my own. At the end of the year, we all took the AP exam. I still vividly remember opening the results and seeing the “5.” It gave me the confidence that I could pursue a career in the sciences. As I began courses at the University of California – Santa Cruz, I decided to study biochemistry because it would provide me with a deep understanding of biological systems. Our biochemistry program was rigorous, working full-time made it more so. After graduating, I considered research and volunteered in a marine biology laboratory. The subject matter was fascinating but found the daily operation uninspiring and inert. I always considered a career in medicine, so when I was offered a position as a clinical specialist I jumped at the opportunity.